Classic Pierogi Dough Recipe
Pierogi are the national food of Poland; here's the recipe for its dough foundation.

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Ingredients

3 Cups Wheat Flour
1 Egg Optional
3/4 Cup Water (Boiling)
1/4 Cup Water (Cold)
1/2 Tsp Vegetable Oil
1/2 Tsp Salt

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Pierogi are quite popular for its simple ingredients and unlimited options for its stuffing. It can be an appetizer, main dish, or dessert.

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Ingredients

Directions

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Pierogi are the national food of Poland, and common throughout the world for the simple ingredients and unlimited options for its stuffing. It can be an appetizer, main dish, or dessert. Traditionally a “peasant food” in Polish cuisine, it is now quite popular to eat at almost any time of day. Pierogi can also be found spelled perogi, pierogy, perogy, pierógi, perogie, pierogie, piroghi, pyrohy, or pyrogy. This recipe is just for the dough, and you can fill in whatever ingredients you desire.

The word pierogi is already the plural form, as it you generally eat more than one at a time; the Polish word for a single piece is pieróg.

Steps

1
Done

Pour the flour through a sifter and into the mixing bowl. Add a half a teaspoon of salt and the egg (egg is optional).

2
Done

Pour the 3/4 cup boiling water slowly into the bowl, while stirring the mixture around with a whisk. Try to remove as many lumps in the batter as possible.

3
Done

Cover the bowl for five minutes and wait. Wash some dishes or something if you have nothing better to do. After 5 minutes, add the quarter-cup of cold water, and let it sit for 15 more minutes; wash some more dishes.

4
Done

Add the 1/2 teaspoon of vegetable oil and knead the dough for a few minutes.

5
Done

With a rolling pin, roll the dough on a flat surface until it is uniformly about 3 mm thick.

6
Done

Cut circles out of dough; using a large cup or small bowl is an excellent replacement for a circle-cutter.

7
Done

Some Tips

* Replacing much of the water with milk (anywhere from a quarter to three-quarters of the amount of water) makes the dough taste sweeter and gives it a velvety texture, perfect for making dessert pierogi or pierogi-filled with cheese.

* Glue pierogi together by moistening half of the edge of a dough circle with some water,folding it together, and then pinching it shut.

* Polish pierogi recipes rarely call for eggs, because it makes the finished product more hard and tough, as opposed to the soft dough that is common, which is why we leave the egg as optional.

Christian E.

Christian started as a travel writer over at Everywhere Fare's sister site, Dauntless Jaunter. He is a xenophile who loves documenting cultures through their history, legends, stories, and, as it is here, their cuisines.

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